Tag Archives: Health

A New Year Beckons

31 Dec

Image result for New beginnings

New Years Eve for me is somehow full of both a touch of sorrow at the reminder of how quickly time passes and full of hope for the fresh beginning the New Year offers.  It’s also a time of reflection and when I look back at 2017, it’s not the endless meetings I’ve attended, places I’ve visited, awards I’ve won or reports I’ve read, but people that come to mind  and some extraordinary acts of generosity and inspirational selflessness.

Jennifer WarrenPeople like Jennifer Warren who died on the 6th December aged just 34.  Her brother contacted me after her death to let me know that ‘She left express instructions that she was happy for Bowel Cancer UK to use her story for the purpose of publicizing the charity’s aims and in particular for the purpose of raising awareness among the young.  She also requested that Bowel Cancer UK should derive some benefit from her funeral donations and hoped in particular that this might be able to be put towards campaigns related to the young, such as #Never2Young.’

Jennifer, like so many other young bowel cancer patients, experienced a delayed diagnosis and so when she was eventually diagnosed it was already at stage 4. She had only just got married and was looking forward to starting a family.

Her blog www.bodyassindex.com all too clearly documents the delight that was her and the awfulness that was her treatment.

Another woman aged 49, who wants to remain anonymous currently, contacted me in October to tell me that she hadn’t been given long to live and to apologise that she wouldn’t be able to help Bowel Cancer UK in the way she had wanted.  She had planned to become an awareness volunteer and to share her story to help ensure others do not have to endure all she is.   Instead she pledged a £5,000 legacy to the charity on her death, which she had been informed would be in early 2018, to make up for her lack of volunteering support.

33 year old father of three, Sam Gould’s reaction to his stage 4 diagnosis in April was to make a film to help raise awareness of the disease.  In those short final months of his life, Sam could not do enough to support Bowel Cancer UK using all his campaigning skill and zeal to publicise and raise funds for our Never Too Young campaign.  His family and friends continue to support us which means so much to us all.  Sam Gould

It is these three remarkable people, and many others, I think about when I reflect on 2017.  Their ability to consider and care about other people at the darkest moments of their own lives is I think inspirational and extraordinarily moving.

Of course New Year’s Eve also makes you look forward to new beginnings and this one feels particularly significant for me.  On 01.01.2018 Bowel Cancer UK and Beating Bowel Cancer will be formally merged as one charity and I’m excited for the possibility that creates.

Both charities achieve a great deal separately but we firmly believe that together we can achieve more.  Together we are determined to save lives, improve the quality of life and provide support to everyone affected by bowel cancer.   We will achieve this through an ambitious programme of research, support services, education and campaigns.

I know 2018 will bring its fair share of challenges and frustrations for our new charity but with another 41,000 people currently unaware that 2018 will be defined for them by a bowel cancer diagnosis, the stakes are high.

For them and for all those who have placed their trust and belief in us, we will not fail.  Of course we can’t #STOPbowelcancer alone – we need people to be actively with us – could you make that your unbreakable New Year’s resolution?  Mine is clear, I am going to give this my all.   I’m going to breathe through the frustrations, calmly problem solve my way through the challenges and keep my sights strategically fixed on improving outcomes, so that one day we can look forward to a day when no one dies of bowel cancer.   I’m ready 2018.

Happy New Year, may it be full of hope, health and happiness.

The Star of Hope

 

For more information about bowel cancer visit www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk or www.beatingbowelcancer.org

To speak to a nurse call: 020 8973 0011

Or visit our Online Forum

 

 

 

Richard Branson and kissing frogs

2 Oct

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“Hello, I’ve have had some very bad news. On Monday I was told by my consultant that not only has the cancer returned its spread to my pelvis and there isn’t a lot more they can do for me, therefore I am now terminal” Michael, 54, bowel cancer patient

“I had a meeting and scan on Friday.  Not good news major spread in the liver and other places. We agreed no more chemo.  It looks like it’s taking hold now” Tony, 50, bowel cancer patient

I really hate bowel cancer.  During my first few days back at work after my long summer break I caught up with my patient friends. Three recurrences, one told now inoperable, one with just a week or two left, three with spread, several with severe reactions to chemo.  Desperation, despair, occasionally acceptance. Bugger.

What makes this harder is that really bowel cancer should be a good news story. It is one of the most treatable forms of cancer.  If it is diagnosed at its earliest stage you have a 93% chance of surviving.  However that can be difficult to achieve for a host of reasons including:

  • low levels of awareness leading to patient delays in seeking advice;
  • GP delays in referring for diagnostic tests because it can be difficult to identify who to refer;
  • low take up of screening and the need for a more sensitive (and easier) screening test:
  • poor surveillance programmes for those at highest risk.

At Bowel Cancer UK we are working flat out to address some of those issues – we run awareness programmes, we train public health and health care professionals, we promote screening, we campaign where we see issues that should be addressed, we provide information and support to people affected by the disease. At the same time we are carefully monitoring and evaluating what we do so we can do it better and share our learning with others. Yet we are still hampered by our lack of scale.

Sir Richard Branson

The need to grow the charity has led to my developing a mild obsession with transformation, change and money!  I’ve started to study the habits of wealthy entrepreuneurs and successful businesses to try and figure out how they made the breakthrough that led them to success, money, influence. I’ve felt vaguely re-assured by the hard graft so many describe prior to take off but I can’t help but wonder what Richard Branson would do if he were CEO of Bowel Cancer UK?

Don’t get me wrong, it is a pretty healthy obsession because all I want is to enable Bowel Cancer UK to do more, for more people. Yet after 22 years working in the voluntary sector I’ve come to realise that money is the charity workers curse.    We don’t have gadgets and gizmos to sell (usually), we only have our issue.   I’m selling an opportunity to be part of saving lives.  Sometimes I’m gobsmacked that it’s such a tough pitch, that so few seem to want to buy into it.

Bowel disease study day

It’s particularly frustrating when we know that there is a real need for what we do – the patients and their families I speak to every day are a constant reminder of that.  I also know that our work makes a tangible difference. For example the independent evaluation of our recent pilot GP study disease days in Birmingham and Manchester commissioned by Cancer Research UK showed that 92% of the GPs attending intend to make positive changes to their clinical practice as a result.  That’s good news as we wanted to support GPs and provide them with the opportunity to consider their practice and to make changes where needed.  Yet we struggle to find the funds to run them.

In our joint Train the Trainer programme with Breast Cancer Care we trained around 100 health care professionals in areas with high incidence and mortality of the disease and the evaluation was fantastic.  It showed that trainees knowledge about and confidence to share information /raise awareness was dramatically increased and as a result they went on to reach over 10,000 people and that number continues to grow.  Clearly this is positive yet the fundraising process to get the necessary funds to run them is long and arduous and there is no guarantee of success.

Never Too Young banner

We are having influence too.  We have worked hard to ensure there is depth and substance behind our Never Too Young policy recommendations and are fortunate to have the support of leading academics and clinicians.  Yet to turn those recommendations into practice requires money to fund the necessary research.  Bids of course have been duly written and submitted and now the agonising wait begins. What a waste of time.   After all, people are dying and this might help change that.

Most days (and too many nights!) I wrack my brain to try and work out what we need to do differently and I am always on the look-out for ideas and open to advice and guidance.  Of course it’s in the wee hours of the night, the self-doubt and self criticism bites and there are times when I long to run away and work in a Cotswold tea room.  When I dream of clarity and simple transactions… you want coffee…here it is.

Yet I just need to think about patients and their families and the impact of losing someone you love and my own feebleness melts away.

My friend Neil, who lost his wife Lindsey to bowel cancer, described it to me so movingly.

‘The whole journey of losing a partner and best friend is very odd. At first the shock protects you a little.

Then you throw yourself into work with unbelievable mania just to avoid thinking about it.

Only now 10 months on has reality kicked in. The loneliness is awful, the sense of there being no purpose to anything any more is high

I am sure this is all part of the process but it is such a painful part

But I am ok – really I am’

I feel such anger that people are going through this and I am bored rigid by steady incremental growth. We need step change.

What makes it feel more urgent is that in my re-networking of the new NHS in England it appears that many politicians and key decision makers in the new organisations have moved on or at least distanced themselves from cancer, as their budgets have shrunk and their portfolios expanded except for where there are big headlines.  Yet many of the changes required are not news grabbers.  For example, increasing endoscopy capacity isn’t really media sexy but it might enable us to detect people quicker when treatment is more successful, yet who is prioritizing that?   Well we are.

Today around 43 people died of bowel cancer and tomorrow another 43 will die and the reality is that many of those deaths could have been prevented.  That’s why money and transformation is so important – to ensure we can dig deep and find meaningful sustainable solutions.  This is definitely not the moment to move on and give up.

Oh dear, I guess the tea room will have to wait and I will just have to keep hunting for that breakthrough moment and ‘kissing frogs’  just in case one turns into a generous benefactor.

I also better finally settle on a new fundraising challenge – it isn’t the solution, but right now every penny helps.

Star of hope

“Never doubt that a small group of thoughtful, concerned citizens can change the world.  Indeed it is the only thing that ever has”

Margaret Mead

If you would like to donate to Bowel Cancer UK you can do so online via our website  www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk or visit my Never Too Young  JustGiving page: www.justgiving.com/deborah-alsina

If you are experiencing any symptoms of bowel cancer, please tell your GP or call our nurse run information and support line in confidence on freephone: 0800 8 403530 or email support@bowelcanceruk.org.uk

Bowel Cancer UK aims to save lives and improve the quality of life of anyone affected y bowel cancer

Bowel Cancer UK aims to save lives and improve the quality of life of anyone affected y bowel cancer

Finding Hope….

9 Apr

sping flowers“Hope is the thing with feathers 
That perches in the soul
And sings the tune without the words
And never stops at all.”

Emily Dickinson

laura 6

I cried this week – tears of sorrow and anger.  Beautiful Laura passed away. She was taken from her family and friends far too young, a month after her wedding day. It was a day I’d been dreading for some time.   It’s simply not right and it makes me angry because her untimely death could and SHOULD have been prevented.  Bowel cancer is after all really a good news story… it is preventable, treatable and curable.  This blog is dedicated to her.

Star of hopeWelcoming Ben Richards…

ben_richards

I hope Laura would have been pleased to hear that 40 year old actor Ben Richards became a patron of Bowel Cancer UK this last week. He is living proof that you can survive bowel cancer.    I was particularly delighted because I’m rather tired, if I’m honest, of simply hearing how embarrassing bowel cancer is.  I can’t help but wonder if by endlessly repeating that, if it doesn’t make it become so.  I know it’s hard for us British/English/Welsh/Scots/Irish* (*delete as appropriate or add your own!) lot to talk about the symptoms.  After all blood in your poo, a change of bowel habit, pain in your tummy aren’t everyone’s hot topic of conversation but my goodness surely it’s far worse to die by not doing so.

Star of hopeLove your bowel

love your gut

I’ve a long-held belief that we need to move the debate about bowel cancer on – we need to take a fresh look at the way we image and talk about the disease in order to find a way to mainstream it.  The word bowel is one of the barriers as people don’t really understand where or what it is compared to say the heart and lungs and think it’s all a bit unpleasant.  I believe we need to change this and educate people about what their bowel is and why it is so vital for our digestive health.

One thing I’m certain about is that many of those without some part, or all, of that question mark shaped internal organ, would testify that life is easier with it than without it.

Star of hope  Giving hope 

I find it terribly frustrating that some cancers are considered ‘sexier’ than others.  If you are a celebrity that has had a ‘sexy’ cancer it seems absolutely acceptable to share your story and even those with no connection to the disease are happy to be associated with it.  Celebrity support certainly gets media attention and that can be positive.  So why should it be any different for bowel cancer?  After all, no cancer is sexy and every cancer patient is as important as another.  I firmly believe that bowel cancer patients deserve the same support as others.  So come on all you ‘celebs’ out there… we need you to stop perpetuating the myth that this cancer is ‘embarrassing’ and talk about it instead.  Please step up, share your stories, show your support, raise awareness – give hope.  You can make a difference.

I can’t help but wonder if Laura had read such a story in a magazine or found it on the internet – maybe, just maybe, she would have known how important those symptoms she was experiencing were and insisted she was checked properly.  Maybe that would have meant her family wouldn’t have been burying her tomorrow and that they wouldn’t have been left absolutely shattered, empty and heartbroken by her loss.

Star of hopeA bright future

Laura’s passing rocked many of my patient friends on Twitter – particularly those with advanced disease – it seemed to give wings to those awful fears lurking beneath the surface and to at least temporarily take away their confidence and hope.  So I want to finish this by sharing one story that should give hope.

Hayley and AutumnHayley was diagnosed at 32 after her baby girl Autumn, was born prematurely at 27 weeks and sadly passed away a few short weeks later because Hayley’s bowel tumour had stopped her growing.  Hayley blogs  incredibly movingly about how Autumn saved her life, as this led to her diagnosis of stage 3 bowel cancer.  Via the wonders of social media, I walked alongside Hayley throughout her treatment and helplessly watched her struggle with chemo and regular emergency visits back to the hospital with infections and high temperatures.  After all that, she also had to deal with radiotherapy too.  It was tough, physically and emotionally and on top of everything else she was grieving for her baby.  Wonderfully, she is now cancer free and her blog describes the future she sees ahead of her.

‘Until recently, I couldn’t see past the treatment – now all I can see is holidays away with Paul, having fun with family and friends and having our family we have always wished for. I can’t think of a better way to celebrate our daughter’s gift to me than having a little brother or sister (or both) to whom we can share our wonderful story of their big sister, Autumn.’

Hayley has a bright future ahead of her but it is very different from the one she expected.  She shared her story for Bowel Cancer UK’s Never Too Young campaign. You can watch it here.

Star of hopeTake action

We launched our Never Too Young campaign because of younger bowel cancer patient’s experiences and to seek positive solutions so that younger patients could be identified and diagnosed more quickly.  I want to be part of stopping this senseless loss of life, I want there to be real reasons for hope.  I’m fundraising because this all costs money and the charity doesn’t have enough.

My tandem Skydive was delayed due to the snow (just a brief reprieve!) but it is looming again, re-scheduled for the 20th April.  When I’m doing it and conquering my very real fear, I am going to think about Laura and remember that she should have enjoyed her future too,  surrounded by her loving family and friends.

Please sponsor me and take action to make positive change by joining Bowel Cancer UK’s  Never Too Young campaign.

 

RIP Laura

Do not stand at my grave and weep

Do not stand at my grave and weep;

I am not there. I do not sleep.

I am a thousand winds that blow.

I am the diamond glints on snow.

I am the sunlight on ripened grain.

I am the gentle autumn rain.

 

When you awaken in the morning’s hush,

I am the swift uplifting rush

Of quiet birds in circled flight.

I am the soft stars that shine at night.

Do not stand at my grave and cry:

I am not there. I did not die.

Mary Frye

To sponsor me please go to  www.justgiving.com/deborah-alsina

For Bowel Cancer information please visit www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk

To find out more about the bowel please follow this link to our interactive diagram

To find out how you can ‘love your bowel’ please click here.

If you have concerns or questions about any aspect of Bowel Cancer, please contact our specialist nurses on Freephone 080 8 40 35 40 or email them on support@bowelcanceruk.org.uk

Mid Life Crisis?

20 Mar

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My closest girlfriend called me the other day to tell me she was worried I was having a mid-life crisis.  She had just heard that I’d signed up to do a skydive and called to talk me out of it – bless her.  My dear friend of 26 years had decided I’d lost the plot finally – maybe she’s right. I mean – why else would you offer yourself up to be thrown out of a plane?

Well I had some reminders recently of why I’m relatively confident about my sanity levels …

Never Too Young

This week Bowel Cancer UK launched a new campaign. ‘Never Too Young’ with the aim of improving the diagnosis, treatment and care of younger (under 50) bowel cancer patients in the UK.  Our campaign film highlights just why this is so important. 

To inform our campaign we conducted research into the experiences of younger patients which we summarised in our Never Too Young report. 

One of the findings that stood out for me was that younger patients are experiencing delays in diagnosis for two main reasons.  Firstly, GP’s are delaying referring people through for diagnostic tests and in fact 42% of women,  compared with ten per cent of men either saw their GP more than five times before being referred to a specialist, or were diagnosed as an emergency before being referred.

Secondly, over half (60%) of patients were not aware of the symptoms of bowel cancer prior to being diagnosed, and were not aware of bowel cancer as a disease younger people could develop. A quarter of people (25%) waited over 6 months to see their doctor as they didn’t realise the significance of their symptoms or felt reluctant to discuss them.  This can have terrible consequences and has for Laura.

Laura was 30 when she was diagnosed with bowel cancer.  She had symptoms for nearly two years before she was diagnosed.  Unfortunately, she didn’t understand their significance and was re-assured when her doctor told her that it could not possibly be bowel cancer because she was too young.  The terrible pain in her tummy was put down to painful periods and the bleeding she experienced on and off for two years wasn’t investigated.  Unfortunately when she was finally diagnosed at the age of 30, the disease had already spread to her liver and her lungs and is now in her bones too.

Laura happy on her wedding day

Laura happy on her wedding day

Despite gruelling treatment, on the 1st March, Laura married her fiancée Alan at their dream wedding in Scotland.  Yet instead of going on her honeymoon, she had to go to hospital to start a new round of palliative chemotherapy instead.  Every contact I have with Laura and her lovely Mum Lesley makes me ache, because I can feel their pain and grief, yet they are amazingly supporting our Never Too Young campaign because they want this to stop.  After all, this should not be happening to Laura, to anyone.

Laura and Alan

Laura and Alan

 

Bowel cancer is treatable but early diagnosis makes that much easier.

Finding Solutions

I know that some will think that our focus on younger patients is a ‘red herring’ because the number of people diagnosed only represents 5% (c. 2,100) of the 41,000  diagnosed each  year in the UK.  I strongly disagree.

To me those c.2000 patients, represent, 10,000 patients over 5 years, 20,000 patients over 10 years – and each one has hopes, dreams and family and friends who love them and whom they love.  They deserve the same chance of and have the same right to life as anyone else.  I resolutely refuse to give up on them simply because they are difficult to target or detect.

However I do acknowledge that the solutions are not straight forward.  GPs for example, have an incredibly difficult job to identify those patients they should be referring on for diagnostic tests.   They will see many young people who have symptoms that could be bowel cancer but may only see a few cases (if that) during their career in the under 50s.   They are also under pressure to refer less people through to endoscopy teams who are over-stretched and under-resourced.

We need to find a solution that empowers and enables GPs to make those difficult decisions and build the capacity of our endoscopy units to ensure they can provide high quality services to meet rising demand.   That’s why we are calling for the development of a risk assessment decision aid tool to be developed for GPs around bowel disease, sustained investment in endoscopy services so this is not a barrier to diagnosis and a registry of younger patients to be set up, so we can better understand the epidemiology of cancer.

Information and Support

Our report also highlights gaps in information and support for younger bowel cancer patients. Only 1 in 4 women and just fewer than 1 in 2 men were happy with the levels of support they received.

Isolation and loneliness is felt by many younger bowel cancer patients. Although peer support was identified as a major factor that could have improved treatment more than half of patients felt that they had no-one their age with bowel cancer to talk to.

Younger patients inevitably have different concerns from older patients – many have concerns about how treatment will affect their fertility, their body image and sexual relationships.  Looking after young children is also a major concern for some.

Katie, husband Stuart and children Sophie 4 and Sam 8

Katie, husband Stuart and children Sophie 4 and Sam 8

Katie, 32, a former national junior ice skating champion has been highlighting the issues she is currently facing in her moving blog, as she tries to come to terms with the reality of  having terminal bowel cancer.   Several recent newspaper articles have highlighted her despair at the prospect of leaving her young children of 4 and 8 without a Mum.

Katie now

Katie now

Katie and her family and friends are currently fundraising for Bowel Cancer UK and remarkably despite all that she is going though she is determined to raise awareness and is supporting our  Never Too Young campaign.

I so wish she didn’t have the personal insight about why this is so very important.

The skydive approaches…

So as I told my lovely friend, I’m OK about jumping out of a plane, despite the fact this is not in my job description and I am absolutely not doing this for ‘fun’.  I’m not an adrenalin junky, I’m not into heights and have no personal desire to put my life in the hands of another person whilst hurdling towards the earth and I’m particularly petrified of landing.  Skydiving has NO appeal to me whatsoever BUT if our amazing patient supporters show such determination to raise awareness and funds, how can I not also face my fears and join them.

So as I have said before, if this resonates with you, if this matters to you and you want to be part of ensuring that younger cancer patients have a bright future please support or join Laura, Katie and me.  Please help us raise awareness and funds so Bowel Cancer UK can continue to campaign for younger patients and further develop our information and support services for them.

Or just sponsor me. http://www.justgiving.com/deborah-alsina

You can also donate via Bowel Cancer UK’s website by following this link. 

Thank you in advance for your support.

If you are concerned about any aspect of bowel cancer, Bowel Cancer UK’s information and support line, staffed by specialist nurses can be reached on freephone: 0800 8 40 35 40 or you can email: support@bowelcanceruk.org.uk

Heart aches, inspiration and fundraising

28 Jan

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“Chemo delayed, blood transfusion, fractured pelvis and possible cancer spread… still hoping to get to London nxt week for wedding dress fitting!” a tweet from a 31 year old advanced bowel cancer patient

“ x’s tumours have grown.  She now has tumours in her ovaries.  She may now not have long left.” From the husband of a young patient, mother of 3, with advanced bowel cancer

There are days when I could simply weep with the terrible news I hear about the impact of bowel cancer on people’s lives.  I am in touch every day with many people who are facing an uncertain and frightening future and I am always deeply moved by their experiences and humbled by the dignity and strength with which they face great adversity.   Along with the heart ache I also feel angry because I know that especially if bowel cancer is diagnosed early it can be cured.  People should not be dying from this disease yet 16,000 people do die, every year.

Working for Bowel Cancer UK, I am so fortunate to walk alongside people going through treatment – to share their ups and downs, hopes and fears.  Celebrating the ‘all clear’ with them is quite simply amazing.  But from personal experience, I also know what it is like to have the appalling realisation that when the suffering is too great, that saying good bye to someone you love is sometimes a blessing.

Saying you are passionate about something is rather a cliché yet for me, about saving lives from bowel cancer, it is an apt description and I fully admit that I take this far too personally.  I genuinely care deeply about bowel cancer patients of any age, having lost my own father to bowel cancer at 79 but right now there is something I want to do for younger patients.  That’s because I think they are being let down.

Young people – and I’m talking about all those from their teens into the 40s are a tough group to target.  Bowel cancer in this age range is relatively rare – only 2,000 people are diagnosed every year compared to 39,000 over 50.  That means the Government/NHS focus is predominantly on the larger group.  I do understand that as no-one wants to cause mass panic – or to ‘flood’ GP surgeries with the worried well.  However patients regularly tell me that they wish they had been aware of the symptoms and acted quicker, as prior to their own diagnosis they thought it was just an ‘older’ person’s disease.  Or that they wish their symptoms had been taken more seriously because when they eventually were diagnosed, their cancer was very advanced.  We must find a way to change this as ALL of their lives matter.

Losing someone far too young can have a profound effect on so many people and at Bowel Cancer UK we are regularly blown away by the amazing support we receive from families and friends of young patients who want to help stop this happening to others.  My heart goes out to all of them as their pain is very real and will never leave them.

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Bowel Cancer UK supporter, Dorcas Crawford (left) with her dear friend and inspiration to me, Rosi Kirker Miller

One patient who had a major effect on me was Rosi Kirker Miller from Northern Ireland.   Rosi was an incredible woman – her cancer was diagnosed very late but she refused to give up and threw her energy into raising awareness of the disease and funds for Bowel Cancer UK.  One evening, driving me back into Belfast after a wonderful dinner with her family, she said to me how she simply wanted to live long enough to get her little boys then 9 and 11 to university.  My heart sank because I knew deep down she wouldn’t and sadly a few short months later she died.  Being Rosi she didn’t let death stop her though.  At her packed funeral service her brother gave a message to us all from Rosi… She wanted to remind us that bowel cancer is treatable if diagnosed early, to act on any symptoms and she urged everyone to get behind and support Bowel Cancer UK.

Wow… I admit at that moment I felt a bit like I’d been punched with the huge weight of responsibility she had placed in me, in us.  She was placing her trust in us to stop this happening to others.  But you know I’m not phased… I’m honoured.   Rosi benevolently haunts me every day and reminds me that the jobs not done yet.  That when it feels really hard and frustrating, like the breakthrough moment will never come, that I need to up my game and do something more.   Her memory reminds me that not succeeding, not ensuring that Bowel Cancer UK meets its mission and saves lives from bowel cancer and improves the quality of life of those going through it, is simply NOT an option.

So I’m thinking out of the box now… I’m tired of being powerless to make a real difference, I have had enough of just listening to heart breaking stories, of knowing people will die through ignorance or lack of timely diagnostic tests.  I’m really tired of never having the funds Bowel Cancer UK needs to deliver services to support and empower people better.    It’s not right and I want to change it, so I’m going to adopt Rosi’s spirit and DO something.

I have absolutely no idea how I’m going to achieve this yet, but I’m launching a fundraising campaign to raise £50K for Bowel Cancer UK’s work with young patients and their families.    I intend to do a number of different fundraising activities over this year including a trek in Jordan but I’m going to start by throwing myself out of a plane on the 23rd March (by co-incidence my dearly loved father’s birthday).

Obviously it’s highly unlikely I’m going to raise £50K without your help, so if this matters to YOU, if this resonates with YOU, please take action – help me.

You can sponsor me, you can join me, you can fundraise too – it will all help.    Together, we have a real chance to make positive changes for younger patients.  Are you up for it?

Change will not come if we wait for some other person, or if we wait for some other time. We are the ones we’ve been waiting for.

 We are the change that we seek.” 
                        ― Barack Obama

To donate please visit:

http://www.justgiving.com/deborah-alsina

You can also set up your own justgiving page but please don’t forget to link it to this team page:  www.justgiving.com/teams/Challenge50K

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