Archive | September, 2015

So it begins…

28 Sep

SalvadorAfter a pretty much sleep free night Judith, Helen and I met at 3am at Heathrow along with our trek leader Phil and the rest of our trekking group.  After what felt like never ending hours of waiting around or flying later (London – Lisbon, Lisbon – Salvador),  we finally arrived in Brazil.  After 24 hours of only a bit of plane sleep I was pretty excited to finally arrive at our first hotel.   We had some time to freshen up then went out for a delicious dinner and had our first briefing about the trek.  It’s a nice size group only 12 of us including Phil and there are many very experienced Trekkers amongst them but all seemingly chilled and uncompetitive.  Phew!

The first morning we left at 8am for a tour around Salvador.  Whilst Helen, Judith and I were keen to get going actually it was a good beginning, as we are all still pretty shattered from the travelling.  Salvador is the third largest city in Brazil and was its capital for many years.  It’s right on the coast and is on two levels – upper town has the old historic centre and is more residential, and lower town is more of the commercial centre but as we drove past clearly has a lot of houses too.

Buildings in SalvadorWe drove to the lighthouse on the seafront and had a chance to walk around the historic old town.  I really like the multi-coloured buildings and cobbled streets.  It reminded me of Havana – similar style buildings and lively vibe with people out in the streets and lots of music blasting out of bars and town squares.

In the afternoon we took our third flight to Lencois which is the gateway town to the Chapada Diamantina.   It’s in the middle of nowhere – perfect – and we were all super excited to finally be here.  We were warmly greeted by our trekking guide Tiago – another super cool Discover Adventure local staff member whose English is excellent.  We were all immediately impressed.  Straight away we drove to the edge of the Chapada Diamantina for a short walk up Father Ignacio’s hill.  It’s a short walk and a scramble up rocks but oh my goodness the views were breathtaking.  I have so been waiting for that view!

Deborah and JudithEven better we were able to watch the sunset which was spectacular.   All the tiredness melted away – I felt energised, excited and ready for the challenge ahead.  The day ended with a lunar eclipse… Wow!

The jetlag remains and I’m up early – 6am – and am delighted to be greeted by sunshine and incredible birdsong and glimpses of red and yellow plumage.  I feel so blessed to be here and experience this – even the nerves and tiredness.  So many of my patient buddies would love it here.  Somehow knowing that makes the whole experience more precious and intense.  Deborah and HelenI will do this for them because bowel cancer is a cruel indiscriminate disease and it’s time it was stopped for good.  So if you can please help by sponsoring Helen, Judith and me to fund bowel cancer research so we can find ways of identifying bowel cancer earlier when it’s most treatable.  It truly will help us save lives.

We leave Lencois today and will have our first full day of trekking in the Chapada Diamantina.  We are so ready.  Bring it on!

Click here for our JustGiving page.

D-Day

25 Sep
chapada-diamantina-national

The Chapada Diamatina National Park, Brazil

Wow! In just a few hours I’m heading to Heathrow and meeting my trekking group at 3am for our 6am flight.  That’s actually quite scary!   I had naively thought this trek would be a smoother build up than it was for China – that my nerves would be less, that my training would be easier, that I’d manage my long to do list better but actually – a bit like having a second baby – it’s not been easier, just different.

There have been a new set of challenges to tackle these last few months.  I mean who’d have thought my lovely comfortable walking boots would decide to start to hurt for the first time, just five weeks from departure.  Or that after finally realizing there was no remedy that I’d only have two weeks to break in a new pair.  Well that’s certainly upped my trek adrenalin levels but whilst not 100% worn in, the bottom of my toes are no longer blistering so that’s a definite win!

Of course I will be fine – it’s simply a long walk after all.   I will do what I can before I leave and the rest will just have to wait.  The world won’t end if I don’t clear my to do list or if I forget my toothbrush – there are normally solutions.  Everything falls into perspective somehow when you work in and live around cancer.  After a period of relative stability, it’s been a tough few weeks with various patient friends struggling with recurrences, complications, side effects and terrible news that the cancer is now incurable.

That, of course, is why I’m going – to show my solidarity, to take action, to do something practical to try and raise funds for research to improve the early diagnosis of bowel cancer so these tragic experiences stop once and for all.  After all 9 out of 10 people survive bowel cancer if it is diagnosed at its earliest stage but currently only 1 in 10 are diagnosed then.  Far more  – over 60% – are diagnosed when there is at least local spread into the lymphatic system or with a secondary tumour.  That makes treatment so much tougher and the odds significantly worse.  It’s also why Bowel Cancer UK’s new research programme will focus on identifying the highest risk groups and look for better ways of preventing and detecting bowel cancer early.  But this requires money and so that’s why I’m happy to go way out of my comfort zone, control my nerves and fly to Brazil to take on this amazing challenge.

If you are still not sure why you should sponsor me and help Bowel Cancer UK – this blog from lovely Gina Shergold, whose husband Steve was diagnosed at the age of 30 and is now only 33, should explain it better than I ever can.

Gina, Steve and Esmee

Gina, Steve and Esmee

Heartbreak. The Worst One Yet

by Gina Shergold

I’m going to try and keep this one relatively short because I don’t think my brain can handle too much more right now.

The last time I wrote, we were waiting for a CT scan and the for the new trial treatment to start.

For the past 6(ish) weeks, we’ve been going into hospital regularly for blood tests, consent forms and so on to get Steve up and running on the trial, and on Thursday last week he had a physical exam to make sure he was well enough and showing no sign of infection etc, with a view to him starting the trial this week.

On Thursday afternoon, we had a call to say that it turns out the trial had been closed for a while and that Steve could no longer participate. They asked us to come in today to discuss other options.

So today, we went in for a meeting with the oncologist and were hoping he would have news on a different trial.

Instead, he told us that there is currently nothing available, and that we are now dealing with a “terminal illness” – incurable.

We are absolutely devastated, shocked beyond belief and heartbroken.

We also learnt that his spine has got in on the cancer action, and more than likely his liver, too, although that part isn’t confirmed yet.

They will keep looking out for trials, and as soon as one comes up that Steve is eligible for, we will be informed and he’ll be put forward for it (provided he wants to be).

Steve has slept for most of today through sheer exhaustion.

I feel numb to the point where I can’t feel my feet on the ground, but at the same time, I’m  in more pain than I’ve ever experienced in my life.

I don’t really know how I’m still standing at the moment but we both agree that we will not give up, we will keep fighting and live every day to the fullest for our baby girl and for each other.

Sorry it’s a short, blunt and pretty rubbish one, but I wanted to keep everyone updated. I’ll write again when I have more information and/or when my head is feeling a bit less fuzzy.

Gina xx

We have to stop this.  We have to stop the pain and anguish bowel cancer causes.  We have to stop people dying and WE CAN – but we need money to invest in research, to raise awareness, to campaign for best treatment and care across the UK.  We need your help.

This is going to be my last fundraising challenge for a while – as I can feel the fatigue with my endless quest for sponsorship – but if you could sponsor me, just one last time – for Gina, Steve and baby Esmee – for everyone affected by this awful disease, it would be awesome.

You can sponsor me by visiting my justgiving page: www.justgiving.com/deborahalsina4

or simply text: GUTS68 £5/£10 to 70070

Thank you

For more information about Bowel Cancer UK visit our website on: www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk

stop bowel cancer banner

Thank you

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