Victim or Survivor?

13 May
struggling image

Struggling…

To have striven, to have made the effort, to have been true to certain ideals – this alone is worth the struggle’

William Osler

 

I’ve been struggling recently.  Struggling with loss, struggling with frustration and a sense of impotence and struggling with anger.   Wonderful, beautiful Katie Scarbrough, who I wrote about a couple of posts ago, died at just 32, leaving two young children aged 4 and 8.   I never met Katie but we spoke, emailed and tweeted and her determination to raise awareness in such difficult circumstances moved me.  I’ve seen it before and if I’m honest I don’t really want to see it again.  I don’t want people to have to turn such deep desperation into positive action.  I want them to laugh freely and be happy.  I want them to live.

Katie looking fabulous in her purple wig with husband Stuart

Katie looking fabulous in her purple wig with husband Stuart

Hearing the terrible news about Katie has also made me reflect on my own reaction to difficult news.  I remember all too vividly when my husband was diagnosed with leukaemia and my father’s diagnosis and death from bowel cancer and how damn cruel and unfair it can feel.  It’s amazing how the ‘why’ questions take over – why me, why us, why now?   Until you find your way forward. That process taught me that you have to make a choice about whether you are a victim or a survivor.

I think what impressed me about Katie – and reminded me of another patient we lost, Rosi Kirker Miller, who I wrote about in my first post – is that even though the disease eventually took them away physically, it didn’t beat them, their spirit remained intact.  They were survivors.   They made sure that out of something dreadful, good will happen.  I admire that tremendously.

Never Too Young bowel cancer patients

Never Too Young bowel cancer patients

So that’s what we are trying to do at Bowel Cancer UK with our Never Too Young campaign.  We are trying to take something really difficult and turn it into something positive.  We embarked on the campaign because we were hearing too many stories like Katie’s.  We thought long and hard about the campaign because we didn’t want to do something trivial – yes the stories will inevitably get media attention – but that’s just not enough.  There has to be substance.  People are struggling and dying so we need to make change happen.

We worked hard to get our recommendations right – we’ve consulted patients and their families and we’ve consulted some of the UK’s leading academic and clinical experts about what could make a real sustainable difference and I think we are on the right track.  You can read more in our campaign briefing.

In short there are two particularly important sets of issues which we believe need addressing:

1. Why are more younger patients developing bowel cancer and is there anything different about bowel cancer in this young age group.  Do they present differently? Are there any genetic links? What is the trigger?  So we are recommending that a registry of younger bowel cancer patients is set up so we can study the epidemiology of cancer in this group.  We also want all younger patients and their families routinely genetically tested.

2.  How can we identify these younger patients more quickly?  So many people have bowel symptoms, but few (thankfully) will have bowel cancer – so who should we be referring for diagnostic tests and what is the right diagnostic test?  That’s why we are recommending that a new risk assessment tool on bowel disease (but including bowel cancer) is developed for use in primary care to help GPs identify which patients to refer and clear guidance developed on which diagnostic test should be used.    We MUST also ensure that screening for high risk groups, for example for those with an inflammatory bowel disease or genetic condition is in place as bowel cancer in this group often presents earlier.

If we can get our recommendations implemented I genuinely believe that we can make a significant difference to younger bowel cancer patients.

You can really help us too by signing our petition asking David Cameron to meet us to discuss this and to take action.  We’ve targeted the Prime Minister directly because this must be an issue for the UK as a whole to address. We cannot simply look at these issues separately in England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland, even though in policy terms, health is a devolved issue.   People are dying or being diagnosed late when treatment is more gruelling but together WE CAN change this.

Katie was a wonderful ambassador for the Never Too Young campaign through her blog, her tweets, her extensive media interviews and when we created the petition I thought about her.  I wanted her to know that we would continue her campaign after she was gone and that her fighting spirit and eloquent articulation of her experiences – often terrible despair at leaving her children – will continue to drive us forward.  We couldn’t save Katie – she was diagnosed too late – but I think at the very least, she would want us to learn from her passing and to work hard to stop it happening again.

So in Katie’s memory, please take action.  Sign our petition now.

Katie Scarborough – Rest in Peace, you will not be forgotten.

 Katie FB1

‘She is Gone’ by David Harkins

You can shed tears that she is gone

Or you can smile because she has lived

You can close your eyes and pray that she will come back

Or you can open your eyes and see all that she has left

Your heart can be empty because you can’t see her

Or you can be full of the love that you shared

You can turn your back on tomorrow and live yesterday

Or you can be happy for tomorrow because of yesterday

You can remember her and only that she is gone

Or you can cherish her memory and let it live on

You can cry and close your mind, be empty and turn your back

Or you can do what she would want: smile, open your eyes, love and go on.

If you would like to donate to our Never Too Young fundraising appeal and help us raise funds to continue this campaign and improve services for younger bowel cancer patients, please visit my JustGiving page: http://www.justgiving.com/deborah-alsina

For more information on Bowel Cancer UK, please visit our website: www.bowelcanceruk.org.uk

If you are experiencing any symptoms of bowel cancer, please tell your GP or call our nurse run information and support line in confidence on freephone: 0800 8 403530 or email support@bowelcanceruk.org.uk

Bowel Cancer UK aims to save lives and improve the quality of life of anyone affected y bowel cancer

Bowel Cancer UK aims to save lives and improve the quality of life of anyone affected by bowel cancer

3 Responses to “Victim or Survivor?”

  1. Tony levy May 13, 2013 at 4:43 pm #

    Lets make a difference for Katie’s sake and for all of us suffering this awful disease.

  2. Natalie Cox May 13, 2013 at 6:11 pm #

    as a friend of Katie I can only echo what you have said and will continue in trying to raise awareness now Katie has gone. she was an amazing lady who gained much admiration from all those that followed her blog and will never be forgotten x

Trackbacks/Pingbacks

  1. About Life, Death and the Pole Star | Taking Action: Deborah's blog - March 25, 2014

    […] my short speech that day I talked about another bowel cancer patient who moved me, Katie Scarbrough, and it reminded me that I tell stories a lot, at work and home, about people we have lost to bowel […]

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